Luka Sabbat, We Need to Talk…

#TRENDSETTER, Art, Articles, Culture, Essays, Non-Fiction

Dear Luka Sabbat,

I am speaking directly to you.

No word limit.

No hashtags.

Luka Sabbat, you have had quite a career despite your age. You are the child of greatness and you walk circles of fashion and prestige that I have never dreamed of being able to even touch growing up in hovels where trauma and poverty was the only thing guaranteed to me. Yet, I still rooted for you, because you’re black, and because I know no matter the walk of life, we all have troubles.

Until, you opened the ashtray you call a mouth to talk down to the hatefully proclaimed “SJWs” and activists. Because, you’re so beyond all of these things that you can criticize them – that you can poke holes in their logic because you float on a plane of ascended philosophy where scrutiny is hobby of the low and uncultured.

You, my brother, with blood not too many generations free of the shackles of the same victimization these people you criticize face everyday they stand up for something, have the audacity to sit there with your pencil thin mustache and SCRUTINIZE the people you mock for scrutiny?

I’m not going to call you stupid.

Stupid people don’t get as far as you do – not without wealthy connections and family’s legacy to stand on top of; Stupid people don’t contribute immensely to philanthropic pursuits – unless they’re going to brag about it later for clout. Stupid people leap to defend abusers and present problematic antics as a hallmark of true vision; Stupid people speak without knowing what they want to say; stupid people are meek; stupid people are hypocrites; stupid people, foolish people, who seem to make it the furthest and get the highest platforms in their pointy leather boots (likely sewn by people who can’t even afford to feel how uncomfortable they are) don’t listen when people let them know WHY they do something: they just brag about how they’re going to make a video, eventually, explaining how THEY think, and how THEY feel, and how IMPORTANT they think they are.

Of course, because NOT EVERYONE IS A VICTIM.

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Luka Sabbat, you are not stupid. You are an idiot. A dilettante. An amateur in thought, theory and execution who got ahold of his parent’s soapbox and thought himself a Cicero! But, honey, Cicero was executed and he changed nothing, because he lacked Understanding. Luka, like him, you will fix nothing the way you are, and the way you think, and the way you carry yourself with utter repugnance. (By the time Cicero was discovered as “influential” his civilization was already dead).

Not Everyone is a Victim, Luka? And that’s why SJWs are wrong? And that’s what’s so heinous about our generation?

Erase your self-righteousness like you erase the allegations against your bros.

No, Luka. Not everyone is a victim, but most people have been victimized, and that’s why insensitive assholes who hype the foolish things you say, and Kanye said, and Trump perpetuates painted SJWs in such a brand.

No activist whom I have ever met has ever stopped at the internet. That’s because the internet is a tool to SHARE information, to experience new thoughts and then to test them in real life – dummy. But hey, you did only one semester of College before you realized anything you could get there your family already had, ain’t that right Mr. Fallback? Your co-star, Yara Shahidi, knows how formidable the internet is in inspiring people to make lasting decisions and choose to dedicate themselves to these issues and — so many rail against, abuse her, trash her as a SJW. I’m sure she feels your sympathies. A great woman, that Yara, and she will inspire many, through the internet, most likely.

Being an activist isn’t counter-culture anymore because you say so? Because you’re SOOOO counter culture? You peel my tuition off flings and hook-ups. What’s really good, my nigga?

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I see right through what you were doing here. Implying our struggles are done with because it’s not like how it “used to be”. And the “old days were better”. Bro, allusions are the tools of real artists, not the playthings of socialites. Keep it real, or keep it in your Balenciagas.

By the way, you’re out here criticizing the “fake” activists, as if they’re the ones who criticized you and your idols. It’s the real activists who be pounding the pavements who are on your ass, and the ass of your friends who do these terrible shit.

Yet, you persist on making it about how people are mean to you for speaking your mind. That it’s this PC culture and other Alt-Right buzzwords. That everyone is just so sensitive: WAH, WHY CANT I BE FRIENDS WITH A RAPIST?

WAH, WHY CAN’T KANYE WEST DISRESPECT AN ENTIRE GROUP OF MARGINALIZED PEOPLE?

WAH, WHY IS IT WHEN I SAY THINGS PEOPLE DISAGREE WITH THEY DON’T LIKE ME ANYMORE? IT’S LIKE PEOPLE DON’T WANT TO AGREE WITH ME BECAUSE THEY DISAGREE WITH ME!

(Bitch, you’re a little baby).

You complain about people being politically correct, and that it’s toxic and harmful to your humanity, when in reality, you’re just angry that no one wants to play in your playpen because you’re mean, and a bully, and no one wants to listen about how you saved those poor unfortunate black(er) people because you’re okay with sexual abuse and racial misconduct — NIGGA!

Grow up, Luka.

Be about more than your image you want people to care about.

Be about more than the echo chamber you squat and shit in and actually realize people are saying these things for other reasons than clout — unlike you.

Be about actually realizing where you stand in this culture and how your actions contradict your intentions.

Then, maybe the criticism you will mean nothing to you, because you know where you stand in the moral swing of things.

 

Steven Underwood

Bachelor’s of Arts in English

 

 

More of Luka’s poignant observations:

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#TOORELATEABLE: GROWN-ISH’s JAZZ AND SKY SPEAK TO MY ENTIRE PERSONALITY AS A HOOD RAT ACADEMIC

Culture

By: STEVEN UNDERWOOD

Being black and an academic is hard enough without being impossibly ghetto as well. Not to speak of my background like its a flaw, but in the world of Academia, there seems to be little to no sympathy for the loud, outlandish and often-times bare knuckle politics that come from street life. GROWN-ISH has somehow found a way to incapsulate the endeavors people like me — like Jazz and Sky (played by Chloe x Halle) — endure whilst in Academia.

People mistake my loudness for a threat, or my passion for aggression. Your words  measured for literal and your prosecuted for it, and you learn a lot of what you perceived was right was in fact, so wrong it is humiliating you thought otherwise. However, there are other moments. Moments where you rightful outrage and disgust is turned into some cartoonish outburst of a toddler, and you are outwardly disrespected as some silly hoodrat with ridiculous tendency.

Yara Shahidi’s Zoey Johnson is definitely of an upper echelon. Her family is wealthy: and often she is disconnected from the problems of others. As her friends reveal, some people aren’t in college for the fun of it or the expectation: some people are carrying the legacies of their entire families on their back and a pressure to succeed that is as alienating as it is challenging. What doesn’t help is that the few black people — if you can even relate to them — sometimes don’t share your issues and, worse, reflect the white washed narratives of wealth you often try to escape.

The pivotal scene happened in the series’ fourth episode: “Starboy” where Zoey is trying to communicate her rejection of a formal relationship with her tutee, Cash Mooney (get the joke?). Zoey goes on her typical rant to her friends, throwing all of her problems at their feet and waiting for them to help (oddly, they always seem focused on only her problems and she’s starting to seem like a very bad friend). Things comedically, and momentarily escalate when Zoey calls the twins rediculous, and created one of the best exchanges in television. Period.

Swerve.

I hate to say power moves like this aren’t attempted in College between friends. But they are. There is an atmosphere amongst first time college students to try to replicate a hierarchy that just doesn’t work amongst mutually ambitious individuals. For most people, the idea that you shouldn’t be trying such tactics doesn’t occur until, perhaps, Junior year. However, the environment gets all too real when you’re being threatened and from a background that you combat threats not with words — but with action.

Don’t call me names. Don’t try to belittle my awareness or intelligence. Don’t sit there and smile while you’re doing it: I’m not gonna throw shade. I might just throw you.

A very reasonable response to an antagonistic behavior. Yet, the impulse that you are wrong is so strong, you second guess it and then, you end up apologizing for a very logical response to someone getting an attitude with you.

I’m enjoying this depiction of the many faces of College as a millenial. I think it’s very necessary to see characters like Jazz and Sky, characters who wrestle with their personalities and upbringing, but rejecting the notion you have to be ashamed of where you come from, rather you should be qualified to embrace it.

 

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