#LOOKS: STEVE, HEIR OF SLYTHERIN

Fashion

By: Steven Underwood

Crappy Camera quality and grimaces are all a part of College Life.

I guess it started with a comment. Sorted into Hufflepuff with the release of the Pottermore test, I’ve always expected to get the normal flack most people throw:

Ha ha, you’re in the useless house!

Aren’t you guys, like, the “special” case wizards? Like the high needs student organization on campus?

I never expected the sideway glance of everyone and the astonished confusion in a: “Huh, you should retake the test, you’re clearly a Slytherin 🐍”

I wanted to be insulted, but they’re right. From my attention to cunning, ambition, viciousness and abandon to collateral damage in my pursuit of Honesty, I do evoke the very visage of a Slytherin. Since then, I’ve noticed my clothing choices have swung away from a neutral Fall coordination and right into an provocative inclusion of sharper colors of agile and ferocity: of Emeralds and Teals. Specifically, my interview attire (seen below) is something that channels the cut throat calmness of a Lawyer: an energy that says murder isn’t something i like or dislike, just something I have to do on Tuesdays

Maybe I should retake that test, and just accept the tact my compassion might be dwindling as I age.

Thick Dad Bod, But Make It Fashion — Slytherin.

Featured Look: Thrift Store Find (Gap Vest); Amazon (Allegra K Men Long Turtle Neck – Black); ASOS Pork Pie in Forest Green

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#LOOKOUT: NO-TRIBESCLOTHING LAUNCHES ‘The Prince Collection’

Fashion

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CEO and Creative Director for the Pan-African inspired boutique, No-Tribe Clothing, Prince Marcus London introduced the premiere ensembles for his “Prince Collection” this last month with a vibrant take on classical west African garb and textiles.

The much-anticipated collection from the highly lauded line borrow the Afro-inspired aesthetic of full-body patterns layered with the spontaneous color combinations the great American aesthetic. The collected looks count the Hieness Royal Shirt amongst its number, capturing a detailed aberration across its thick clam white fabric. Never to be outclassed, the outerwear includes the Palace Coat, a tantalizing black-and-white winter jacket complete with a comforting, evenly geometric pattern, and the Royalty Jacket, an elegantly Versailles inspired golden lined bomber kissed either with a brilliant crimson-or-black trim.

Take a look at the collection above and tell us friends what you think!

SOURCE: Notribeclothing

#CLOUDEDVISIONAPPAREEL: VINTAGE COOGI PULLOVER

Fashion

FOUND HERE

Popular during the 1990s era of the Notorious B.I.G, Coogi is still one of the most popular brands within the hip-hop community. 

PRICE: 150.00

Label: Coogi Australia 

Tag Size: Large 

Fits Like: Large/ X-Large (Can worn over-sized, as shown on model) 

Pit to Pit: 27 inches 

Length: 25.5 inches 

Sleeve Length: 19.5 inches 

100% Mercerized Cotton 

*For additional details please email CloudedVisionApparel@gmail.com

#STYLEHITTER: Balenciaga’s ‘TRIPLE S’ Sneakers Are Just Expensive Sketchers

Fashion

So, how isn’t this whole “Sketchers are ugly and no one with self-respect over the age of 10 should be wearing them, except white suburban fathers and sex offenders” about class and elitism?

Balenciaga released what even GQ, the premiere magazine for men’s luxury fashion, called “ugly” and suddenly it is lit to rock something audaciously like this:

 

#TRENDSETTER: mufaro limited, Cincinnati, OH

#TRENDSETTER, Fashion, Non-Fiction

By: Steven Underwood

Product Rating: 4/5

Ohio has a lot of inspiring artists walking the scarlet pavements, and even more inspiring black businesses. On the suggestion of model, Brandon Watters, I decided to look for one instead of supporting some white enterprise and feeding the capitalist agenda. I still ended up feeding the capitalist agenda, but I also ordered one of my new favorite tops.

Mufaro’s boutique is a collection of largely unisex East African-inspired streetwear. The founder, Mufaro (IG: mufaro_ltd), is a Zimbabwean born designer from Cincinnati, Ohio who was featured in numerous fashion shows including the Ankara Miami fashion week, the RAW Artist showcase, and the Emani +Mufaro Expose in Dallas, Texas. Mufaro LTD.

But, even with these ventures under his breath, I only really needed to know he was an Ohio artist, and I leapt right into his site and put my coin into his purse.

I ordered the Dashiki Extended Shirt/Skirt ($60.00). A neat black long sleeve with a flowing skirt covered in Zimbabwean-inspired print and three zippers on either side and up the tail. It is a unisex piece that men can wear as an extended tee (which I do), or as a skirt.

Photos courtesy of Mufaro LTD homepage

Ever since I collected the shirt, I have worn it exactly five times, and it has never failed to impress. It’s infinitely versatile: suitable for numerous occasions and makes a very clear statement about what I am about. I get compliments and unlike when I usually try out something new in my style choices, I don’t feel any bit of self-consciousness and hyper visibility. The one issue that I encounter is that many of the western-inspired styles that frequent my closet do not – or cannot really match the design choice. But, I enjoy a challenge; and this outfit gives me a challenge to own my own unique style – because style should never come easy, especially when you’re doing it for yourself and not for the power in the brand.

The design is beautiful, and the only real difficulty I had with the end product was a trouble with the stitching that came undone on the inseam when stretched just a little too much when I pulled the shirt on. Still, the product is beautiful.

***

mufaro limited New line imagined by Zimbabwean born Mufaro (male) Based in Ohio (Cincinnati) Inquiries|mufaroltd@gmail |Ankara Miami fashion week www.mufaroltd.com

Review: TACKMA

Fashion, Non-Fiction

A review of the boutique

Location: 844 N High St, Columbus, OH 43215

By Steven Underwood

I didn’t even know I was walking into a clothing store, if I’m being honest.

My friend, Matty, invited me out to an opening of some sort my last day in Columbus and I decided: why not, my brain is decaying in this house and I can blow a quarter C-note on an Uber.

Walking into the place, the first thing you notice is a pool table and a DJ booth. Today’s Hip-hop only, and it didn’t feel close to ashamed about it. I didn’t come to play: I gravitated to the clothes and began to pick through it. Hoodies, hats and trench-coats. Most of the clothes never dropping beneath a hundred dollars a pop. The most affordable objects in the entire room were the hats. Lucky for them, I was fake-balling for the day, so I didn’t turn around and leave.

But, I wasn’t going to blow more than a hundred there. I decided it was best to just bide my time, go to their online store and keep it simple. So, I blew 95 dollars on two hats because the material was like rubbing my hand across a suede jacket. I was judged by Matty, and I felt like I should be judged, but I’m a victim to the aesthetic.

Supporting Columbus business is also the goal of the day, really. I could’ve went across the street to the faux-bohemian boutique and blew a hundred dollars — hell, I was probably going to spent a hundred dollars online in a week anyway. The different? There were a lot of black faces in the store; the clothes were nice; and I have a hairline that’s evaporating like American patriotism in a post-Trump presidency: hats are vital. 

My issue (besides the pricing) was the lack of diversity in the boutique. There were hoodies and jackets, jacket and hoodies. Joggers, joggers and more joggers. All of them had essentially the same style, and none of it had any style that felt like it was…me.

In all, the place was great, though. I would’ve bought a hoodie and a jacket if I could stand. But, I’m a starving college student and Trump is my president. I’m hoarding my rubees for a McChicken on a snowy day (and I don’t even like McDonalds)

I give it four out of five stars that do not exist because they’re social constructs.